What’s Sex After 50 Really Like?

And can it actually get better in your 60s and beyond? Here’s why menopause may actually mark the true beginning of mind-blowing sex. 

Q: Can sex lead to a dislodged IUD?

Dislodged IUD

A: Here’s the good news: It is highly unlikely—even if your sexual partner has a long penis, and even if you feel some discomfort after sex—that sex can dislodge your Intrauterine Device (a.k.a. IUD), a T-shaped device just a little bigger than a quarter that’s placed inside your uterus to prevent pregnancy. The simple, anatomical reason for this is that a woman’s vagina ends at the base of her cervix—which connects the vagina to the uterus—and a penis cannot enter the cervix, where the tissue is too thick to allow anything in (regardless of perceived penetration!). 

Related: It’s Time to End Our Obsession With Herpes. Here’s Where to Start

To place the IUD in your uterus, your doctor will use a small tube that’s inserted through your vagina and cervix. Strings attached to the IUD will hang 1-2 inches into the vagina, so your doctor can remove it when needed. You may be able to feel these strings if you put a finger deep into your vagina and touch your cervix. Your partner may also be able to feel your IUD strings during sex, which can cause irritation in rare cases. If this is happening, your doctor should be able to trim or reposition the strings. Also, keep in mind that the strings will soften over time, which may make them less noticeable during sex and cause less irritation.

Related: Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Vaginal pH, Plus When (and How!) to Test Yours

In the very unlikely situation where sex has led to a dislodged IUD, it’s much more likely to happen within the first few months of insertion as your uterus gets used to the foreign object. And if it does happen, it’ll be very difficult for you to tell as you likely won’t have symptoms. If you have a suspicion that this has happened, you can insert your fingers into your vagina to see if you can feel the strings of the dislodged IUD. If you’re really worried, make an appointment with your doctor ASAP who can check the location of your IUD and make sure it’s in place, which will likely be done via transvaginal ultrasound. 

For more sexual health content, click here.

– With input from Carolyn Moyers, DO, FACOG, Founder and President at Sky Women’s Health in Fort Worth Texas; Brittany Noel Robles, MD, MPH, CPT, Founder of PostpartumTrainer; and Tia Jackson-Bey, MD, reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist at RMA of New York
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